Showing posts tagged future of news.
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paulbalcerak / week in review

Ask me anything   Submit   Everything I want to remember from the week, pulled from my blog, Twitter feed and Delicious account, and the occasional original Tumblr post.

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The fact is, the idea that advertisers are constantly meddling in coverage is a myth. The truth is, the small business owner has much bigger worries than how you’re covering the next election, or whether you’re making life hard on the mayor. He wants to know first and foremost: are you helping to add a few more ting-a-lings to the ring of his cash register.

So, my bottom line: I believe that advertising supported journalism — especially for the small, independent operation — is the purest, cleanest, best way to fund local reporting.

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— 3 years ago with 3 notes
#advertising  #ads  #hyperlocal  #future of news  #future of journalism  #journalism business model  #small business 
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The way to fight print circulation declines isn’t to move away from good print journalism, but to embrace what makes print a great platform for great journalism.

My advice to publishers: Embrace the web as the web; celebrate print as print. Don’t try to transfer one mindset on the other.

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— 3 years ago with 2 notes
#howard owens  #print journalism  #web journalism  #future of journalism  #newspapers  #future of news 
"Do I trust WikiLeaks? Maybe not. But if the Times trusts them, perhaps I do."

People may be running to blogs and the internet over traditional news sources, but traditional news sources can still use their credibility to play kingmaker. (By the way: NYT, Der Spiegel and The Guardian have been mentioned almost as often as WikiLeaks in the coverage I’ve seen/read. That’s free branding.)

Poynter Online | How WikiLeaks is Changing the News Power Structure

— 3 years ago
#wikileaks  #new york times  #der spiegel  #the guardian  #future of news  #future of journalism  #afghanistan war documents 
"Apollo is quite similar to Pandora in that it uses an algorithm (using factors such as time spent on articles, sources favorited, articles liked/not-liked as well as social elements like Twitter and Facebook mentions and similar peoples’ tastes etc.) to help users discover the best content for them in a variety of categories (Top News, Business, Tech, Sports and so on)."
— 4 years ago with 2 notes
#apollo news  #hawthorne labs  #google news  #newspapers  #future of news  #future of journalism 
"Everyone’s waiting to see what will happen with the paywall – it’s the big question. But I think it will underperform. On a purely financial calculation, I don’t think the numbers add up.” But then, interestingly, he goes on, “Here’s what worries me about the paywall. When we talk about newspapers, we talk about them being critical for informing the public; we never say they’re critical for informing their customers. We assume that the value of the news ramifies outwards from the readership to society as a whole. OK, I buy that. But what Murdoch is signing up to do is to prevent that value from escaping. He wants to only inform his customers, he doesn’t want his stories to be shared and circulated widely. In fact, his ability to charge for the paywall is going to come down to his ability to lock the public out of the conversation convened by the Times."
— 4 years ago with 1 note
#clay shirky  #paywall  #paywalls  #journalism business model  #future of news  #future of journalism 
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…what we found is that newspapers all too often have more in common with a factory assembly line. When you’re trying to get a newspaper out, there’s intense pressure to meet deadlines every day. That makes it very hard for newspapers to innovate.”

To survive, newspapers must evolve into “the networked information provider of the future — the networked, entrepreneurial local information hub,” Benner said. That will allow them to expand their audiences and revenue sources.

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— 4 years ago
#journalism business model  #future of journalism  #future of news 
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The editor of the London newspaper, The Sunday Times, admits he’s expecting a big drop in readership when the paper’s website puts up its pay wall next month. John Witherow tells Press Gazette:

“…the vast majority of readers” – perhaps more than 90 per cent – were likely to be lost once the paywall went up next month but that advertisers would be attracted by “a smaller core” of dedicated readers. Witherow said that future digital content was likely to be funded through a “hybrid” mixture of ads and paid-access, adding that if readership was 100,000 behind the paywall that would likely bring in £10m revenue in subscriptions to the Sunday Times.”

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— 4 years ago
#paywall  #paywalls  #the london times  #the times of london  #rupert murdoch  #news corp.  #news corp  #future of news 
"…think how helpful Foursquare could be for a food reviewer (I’ve seen people mention things like vermin in checkins at various restaurants and bars), a crime reporter (I can easily see someone reporting gang activity or shots fired via a Foursquare checkin) or even an entertainment reporter (tons of people usually equates to something cool –- find out which concerts and music venues are racking up the checkins and proceed accordingly)."
— 4 years ago
#hyperlocal  #foursquare  #geotagging  #geotag  #location based  #lbs  #local news  #future of news  #mobile  #mobile news  #mobile journalism 
"My position is that there’s no such thing as objectivity in reporting, at all, period," says Matthew Cardinale, the 28-year-old news editor of the Atlanta Progressive News. "In fact, I think that it’s kind of arrogant to say that you can be the arbiter of what is reality."
— 4 years ago
#trust  #future of news  #future of journalism  #bias  #journalism bias  #media bias  #reporting 
Jay Rosen's TEDx talk on crowdsourcing →

Jay Rosen talks about how crowdsourcing has impacted journalism and how journalism can improve by using it.

— 4 years ago with 1 note
#crowdsourcing  #journalism  #crowdsource  #jay rosen  #future of journalism  #future of news 
There’s a lesson here for newspapers: If you don’t innovate, you may be OK for the time being, but you’ll be screwed 10 years down the line (AOL: Where it all went wrong | GDS Publishing).

There’s a lesson here for newspapers: If you don’t innovate, you may be OK for the time being, but you’ll be screwed 10 years down the line (AOL: Where it all went wrong | GDS Publishing).

— 4 years ago
#innovation  #innovate  #aol  #aol.  #america online  #aol fail  #future of news  #future of journalism 
"

…traditional media outlets don’t particularly want to hear what people have to say. They want to create content and have people consume it.

"Newspapers don’t like to hear the voice of people, and they are especially disturbed by the voice of assholes," [Jeff Jarvis says].

Often online, it seems like the voice of disgruntled users is the one that is the loudest, and becomes most prominent. Jarvis says this is only natural given the nature of most commenting systems.

"We allow comments only after we are done with what we’re doing. It’s inherently insulting. We finish our work or stories and say, "Now you can talk about them."

Jarvis thinks that feedback would be much more useful during the process of writing a story. Of course, many publications are using their comments to fuel new stories and continue the reporting process. But for Jarvis, that’s not good enough. He thinks that the crowd would be more influential during the process of creating stories.

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— 4 years ago with 2 notes
#newspapers  #journalism  #future of journalism  #future of news  #comments  #twitter  #community engagement